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Factors influencing parental acceptance toward the use of passive immobilisation as behaviour guidance in children during dental treatment: a scoping review

  • Norsaima Ismail1,2
  • Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera Mohd Yusof3,4
  • Ilham Wan Mokhtar5,*,

1Centre for Paediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics Studies, Faculty of Dentistry, Sungai Buloh Campus, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Jalan Hospital, 47000 Sungai Buloh, SEL, Malaysia

2Ministry of Health, Kompleks E, Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan, 62000 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia

3Centre of Oral & Maxillofacial Diagnostics and Medicine Studies, Faculty of Dentistry, Sungai Buloh Campus, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 47000 Sungai Buloh, SEL, Malaysia

4Institute of Pathology, Laboratory and Forensic Medicine (I-PPerForM), Sungai Buloh Campus, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 47000 Sungai Buloh, SEL, Malaysia

5Centre for Comprehensive Care Studies, Faculty of Dentistry, Sungai Buloh Campus, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Jalan Hospital, 47000 Sungai Buloh, SEL, Malaysia

DOI: 10.22514/jocpd.2024.053 Vol.48,Issue 3,May 2024 pp.6-14

Submitted: 06 July 2023 Accepted: 10 August 2023

Published: 03 May 2024

*Corresponding Author(s): Ilham Wan Mokhtar E-mail: ilham@uitm.edu.my

Abstract

Exploring parental opinions regarding the use of passive immobilisation during dental treatment is critical when identifying behaviour guidance application priorities. Instead of being dismissed as an inappropriate and less favourable option, this article aims to systematically evaluate factors affecting parental acceptance toward the use of passive immobilisation as behaviour guidance among children during dental treatment in various populations and regions. This research follows Arksey and O’Malley framework and updated by Joanna Briggs Institute Framework for Scoping Reviews methodology to summarise 40 research papers from 1984 to 2022 in PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, EBSCO Host, Scopus, grey literature and Google search outlining the research trend of parental acceptance toward passive immobilisation as behaviour guidance. Factors influencing parental acceptance toward the use of passive immobilisation were classified into parental socio-economic and demographic characteristics, exposure method of the devices to the parents, type of dental procedures, and children’s cooperation and cognitive level. In conclusion, the current explorative review of the parental perspective toward passive immobilisation proposed a recommendation and facilitate the dentist to consider this technique as an alternative option for behaviour guidance in paediatric dentistry.


Keywords

Passive; Immobilisation; Restraint; Children; Special needs; Dental treatment


Cite and Share

Norsaima Ismail,Mohd Yusmiaidil Putera Mohd Yusof,Ilham Wan Mokhtar. Factors influencing parental acceptance toward the use of passive immobilisation as behaviour guidance in children during dental treatment: a scoping review. Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 2024. 48(3);6-14.

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